If You are Christ… 

Tuesday of the 4th Week of Easter; 9th May 2017.

It was the feast of the Dedication at Jerusalem; it was winter, and Jesus was walking in the templ, in the portico of Solomon. So the Jews gathered round Him and said to Him, “How long will you keep us in suspense? If you are Christ, tell us plainly.” Jesus answered them, “I told you, and you do not believe. The works that I do in my Father’s name, they bear witness to me; but you do not believe, because you do not belong to my sheep. My sheep hear my voice, and I know them and they follow me; and I give them eternal life, and they shall not perish, and no one shall snatch them out of my hand. My Father, who has given them to me is greater than all, and no one is able to snatch them out of the Father’s hand. I and Father are one.”

John 10:22-30

In the gospel reading of today, we see the Jews grow impatient towards Jesus. Impatient to the fact Christ refused to call Himself the Messiah by words. Impatient that He was taking so long to assume the throne and declare Himself King. But they failed to realize that He came for a greater purpose than to claim earthly kingship. He came to care, love, show mercy and give life. The more their eyes saw, the more their minds failed to believe, thus they didn’t understand and remained in suspense to Christ’s mission in their lives. 

Most times we fail to see the work of God in our lives and question His love for us His children. Sometimes we are blinded from seeing His good doings and we demand for words of assurance. We grow impatient and may go off on the wrong path cause we listened to the evil voices of the world. But Christ tells us that it begins not just by the word of God saying so, but by our belief in Him and the Good News He brings. We will never be in suspense once we know and believe that Jesus is the Risen Lord and if we listen to His voice everyday. We are guaranteed eternal life when we grow in knowledge of God and in followership of Jesus Christ.

It’s high time we removed the doubt out of the statement “If you are Christ…” and strengthen our belief well enough to proclaim “You are Christ”, and may the Almighty Father give us the grace to always listen to the voice of Jesus our Good Shepherd and believe in His abiding presence. 

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“I Know My Own.”

Monday of the 4th Week of Easter, Year A. 8th May 2017.


“I am the good shepherd. I know my own and my own know me, as the Father knows me and I know the Father; and I lay down my life for the sheep. And I have other sheep, that are not of this fold. I must bring them also, and they will heed my voice. So there will be one flock, one shepherd.”

John 10:14-16

In today’s gospel, our Lord Jesus Christ continues to explain his Shepherdship for us his sheep. “I know my own and my own know me.” This points us to the need to know our Saviour, to be in a constant conversation with Him and to know His will for our lives and follow Him daily. And if we feel like outcasts—away from the righteous people of God, lost and desolated—we can always if rest assured that our Lord Jesus Christ will come looking for us the moment we cry out of help and mercy, bringing us to His fold once again.

Jesus showed how much He loved mankind by laying down his life for us His sheep. This beckons us to ask ourselves how much we are willing to sacrifice our time and energy to those we love and also to question how willing we are in giving our all into our daily work, into our relationships and into our family.

People are getting lost everyday. It’s our duty as imitators of Christ to have a deep and personal relationship with Him, to listen to Him and learn to be shepherds to those around us, thus leading them to the Good Shepherd who is our Saviour Jesus Christ. 

May we be given the grace to sacrifice ourselves for others, for in laying down our all, we get to rise victorious like Jesus the Good Shepherd.

The Good Shepherd 

4th Sunday of Easter, Year A; 7th May 2017.

At that time: Jesus said, “Truly, truly, I say to you, he who does not enter the sheepfold by the door but climbs in by another way, that man is a thief and a robber; but he who enters by the door is the shepherd of the sheep. To him the gatekeeper opens; the sheep hear his voice, and he calls his own sheep by name and leads them out. When he has brought out all his own, he goes before them, and the sheep follow him for they know his voice.” “Truly, truly, I say to you, I am the door of the sheep. I am the door; if anyone enters by me, he will be saved, and will go in and out and find pasture. The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy; I came that they may have life, and have it abundantly.”

John 10:1-4, 7, 9-10

Two prominent words in today’s liturgy of the word: the sheep and the shepherd.

 The sheep. When the word ‘sheep’ comes up, we as Christians have that automatic default thought of the story about their seperation from the goats on the final day and how the sheep is used to depict gentleness and righteousness. But today Our Saviour lets us see the sheep through the gospel reading as something different: weak and without direction. And this is what we are if we can truly call ourselves sheep; gentle and righteous maybe, but weak and without direction. We are weak to trials and temptations on our own and bound to sin. Like sheep we are vulnerable, incapable of taking great care of our souls without grace and mercy, easily getting weary when evil strikes. We have no natural sense of the right direction most times and may deviate from the right track every now and then, if not guided.

The Shepherd. But Our Lord Jesus Christ presents Himself to us today as the Good Shepherd. He is the one who enters the sheepfold of our hearts through the open door without forcing His way in by climbing over our walls. He is the right voice we the sheep are to listen to and follow for it is He who gives us repose in fresh and greener pastures, leading us near restful waters thus reviving our souls. He is the door to our salvation, the door to the blessings and eternal life we seek. 

Although we as sheep are weak and seem not to know which way to go in life, our Lord Jesus the Good Shepherd assures us of how he is willing to go a great measure to protect us from the evil ones and save us from our foes. Like St. Peter in the first reading, we need to “save ourselves from this crooked generation,” a generation where the predator seeks to devour and destroy the sheep. We need to flee from the voice that calls out to us to sin. 

The Good Shepherd never stops calling us whenever we go astray to the voices of the world. May we listen to Him so that goodness and mercy shall be truly ours